A hand offering white flowers shaped like speech bubbles to another outstretched hand

My Sleep Affirmations

I'd like to dedicate some words to those in the sleep disorders community. Words, that if you'd like, have the option that you can come back to, read aloud or quietly, and remind yourself that you are not your illness, and you can overcome the hard days – yes, even the hardest ones.

Maybe you don't feel as connected to one as you do another – YOU have the ability to change that affirmation. Change anything you like. If it helps, place words or phrases on your bathroom sink, your mirror, or your drinkware cupboard.

Make these words your own

Remember, these are your affirmations; make them reflect how you feel. Say out loud what you know to be untrue, and fix that – even when you may not be feeling it as strongly as to what you know isn't true.

I am not my illness

I am not my illness.
My reflection is not always me.
These bags my eyes carry may not be designer,
but I know they do not reflect who I am, what I can give to the world, and what is inside me.

I am not my illness.
The monsters that come out at night
are a reminder of what it's like to feel alive.
Scared, I may be. But I know that I am living.
When I wake, I feel my heartbeat.
I watch my chest rise and fall.
I am scared, but I am alive.
I am scared, but I am alive.

I am here

My nightmares may crumble me straight to the floor.
But I feel the cold, hard floor on my chest.
I take my knees to my chest and rock slowly until my back is on the floor.
I place my hands on my stomach.
I breathe in deeply through my nose.
I breathe out deeply and slowly through my mouth.
I whisper to myself, "I am real, that was not."
I repeat.

I say, "That felt real, but I am here.".
"I am safe."
"I am safe."
"I am safe."

I am safe

I remind myself out loud,
"It may have happened,
but I am here and
I am safe now."
That was my then,
This is my now.

I look up, as I lie still.
I tell myself these things I know are true:
I am strong (even when I don't have to be).
I am worthy (even when I don't feel like I am enough).
I am capable (even when I need help).

I am changing (for the better).
I am breathing (so I know I am alive).
"I am safe."
My thoughts matter (even when they feel dark).
My feelings are valid (even when my mind races).
"I am safe."

Capable of change

My sleep may be surrounded by the monsters of my past.
But I am proof that I outlive the monsters (even when I feel I can't).
I am capable of change (seeking help is proof of that).
I am willing to change (for my own well-being and mental health).
"I am safe," (because I seek help).

Many days I am weary,
Will this last forever?
Will my memories stay,
Until my memory fades?
"I am safe."

A sip of water

I'm sick of surviving, not thriving.

I place my hands on the cold floor.
I feel the coolness and am reminded, I'm here now.
I slowly pick myself up and sit on the floor against my bed.
This bed is my safe place (one day I will not fear it).

I collect my thoughts, get up, and slowly sip a glass of water.
I look in the mirror and remind myself:
"You are loved."
"You are safe."

I let the water trickle down my throat.
I feel the moment it goes into my stomach.
I'm reminded that self-nourishment is important.
I feel a sensation of being full.
I give myself time to think of two things I am grateful for before returning to bed.

I am grateful

I say each out loud.
I feel it in my soul.
"I am grateful that I have had time to regroup, settle my racing thoughts, and ignore what consumes me."
"I am grateful to have a place to lay my head down at night, think of fond memories as I lull off to sleep, and have the capability to remind myself with each deep breath."

I am safe.
I am safe.
I am safe.

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